Cheating Goes High-Tech

benkraal:

The cheating/cheating-detection-system arms race.

The incoming new year marks the end of one era and the start of a new one for this tertiary education news blogging.

So it’s sayonara to It’s work…honest and hola to EduNews, with a new look and increased functionality.

So come join me at edunewsvic.tumblr.com!

Christmas brings the joys of relentless celebration, which can be fun and productive. Along with crackers and chardonnay come opportunities to network. Informal get-togethers provide opportunities to build connections that advance both business and career. At least, they might. Some folk thrive in this environment, but not all. Looking around the room at business functions, I feel daunted because, deep down, I’m an introvert.
Do others share this experience? Many of us struggle at these events, but nobody admits it. Everyone slaps on a smile and wanders round the room shaking hands, laughing and exchanging business cards. Inside we feel awkward, loitering at the edge of conversations, unsure when to enter and exit the group. We’re terrified of becoming a third wheel or worse, drifting aimlessly, wondering if we’re invisible. And all while that little voice in our heads reminds us of all the important people in the room we want to meet. We beat ourselves up, thinking how we should be better at this.
(via Five networking tips for introverts)

Christmas brings the joys of relentless celebration, which can be fun and productive. Along with crackers and chardonnay come opportunities to network. Informal get-togethers provide opportunities to build connections that advance both business and career. At least, they might. Some folk thrive in this environment, but not all. Looking around the room at business functions, I feel daunted because, deep down, I’m an introvert.

Do others share this experience? Many of us struggle at these events, but nobody admits it. Everyone slaps on a smile and wanders round the room shaking hands, laughing and exchanging business cards. Inside we feel awkward, loitering at the edge of conversations, unsure when to enter and exit the group. We’re terrified of becoming a third wheel or worse, drifting aimlessly, wondering if we’re invisible. And all while that little voice in our heads reminds us of all the important people in the room we want to meet. We beat ourselves up, thinking how we should be better at this.

(via Five networking tips for introverts)

The Minister for Higher Education and Skills, Peter Hall, has been formally advised by the Boards of Advance TAFE and GippsTAFE, and by Federation University Australia, that they wish to pursue a new formal partnership to sustain Gippsland’s education and training options.
Their decision follows a comprehensive review of several potential partnership options, which seeks to create a sustainable future for Gippsland-based education.
(via Advance TAFE: Partners to join up for regional education)

The Minister for Higher Education and Skills, Peter Hall, has been formally advised by the Boards of Advance TAFE and GippsTAFE, and by Federation University Australia, that they wish to pursue a new formal partnership to sustain Gippsland’s education and training options.

Their decision follows a comprehensive review of several potential partnership options, which seeks to create a sustainable future for Gippsland-based education.

(via Advance TAFE: Partners to join up for regional education)

The Victorian Opposition says a new asbestos agreement between the Education Department and WorkSafe shows there has been a risk to student safety.
Fairfax Media reports a raft of changes have been made after WorkSafe documents revealed the Education Department was taken to court over the matter.
As part of the agreement, schools that contain asbestos will be required to display warning signs, principals will receive training and there will be a mass audit of schools.
(via Victorian schools to be forced to display asbestos warning signs - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation))

The Victorian Opposition says a new asbestos agreement between the Education Department and WorkSafe shows there has been a risk to student safety.

Fairfax Media reports a raft of changes have been made after WorkSafe documents revealed the Education Department was taken to court over the matter.

As part of the agreement, schools that contain asbestos will be required to display warning signs, principals will receive training and there will be a mass audit of schools.

(via Victorian schools to be forced to display asbestos warning signs - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation))

TRAINING colleges in South Australia face massive funding cuts and course caps at a time when Holden’s closure is expected to trigger huge demand for retraining.

The Weekend Australian understands the state government will next year slash $83 million or about 45 per cent from TAFE South Australia’s budget, initiating a round of redundancies and course closures.

Sir Michael was particularly critical of the way the rankings were influenced by factors that seemed to equate higher price with higher quality, and suggested that universities were afraid of setting the price of their courses too low.

“If you set the price too low people will think it is not very good – a bit like buying a bottle of wine on a Friday night. If it only costs £2.99 you will think it is not very good.”

“Someone needs to break the cost-quality paradigm. In other parts of our lives you can have improving quality and falling cost,” said Sir Michael.

Every year, universities spend hundreds of millions of pounds on bursaries and other financial incentives to help disadvantaged students with the costs of higher education.
But research suggests that the people they are designed to help have almost no idea what the word “bursary” means.
Steven Jones, researcher at the Manchester Institute of Education at the University of Manchester, interviewed 198 Year 10 and 11 pupils – all academically on track to be able to enter university – at three deprived schools, just as higher tuition fees were introduced in September 2012. Only one of them knew what “bursary” meant.
“When we talk about bursaries, we’re speaking a language that is completely unknown to these students,” said Dr Jones, who was speaking at the annual conference of the Society for Research into Higher Education, held in Newport, South Wales on 11 December.
(via ‘Bursary’ means nothing to disadvantaged pupils | News | Times Higher Education)

Every year, universities spend hundreds of millions of pounds on bursaries and other financial incentives to help disadvantaged students with the costs of higher education.

But research suggests that the people they are designed to help have almost no idea what the word “bursary” means.

Steven Jones, researcher at the Manchester Institute of Education at the University of Manchester, interviewed 198 Year 10 and 11 pupils – all academically on track to be able to enter university – at three deprived schools, just as higher tuition fees were introduced in September 2012. Only one of them knew what “bursary” meant.

“When we talk about bursaries, we’re speaking a language that is completely unknown to these students,” said Dr Jones, who was speaking at the annual conference of the Society for Research into Higher Education, held in Newport, South Wales on 11 December.

(via ‘Bursary’ means nothing to disadvantaged pupils | News | Times Higher Education)

New analysis by the Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER) reveals that, while there has been a substantial decline in the proportion of university deferrals in Victoria since student financial support has been increased, location and socioeconomic status continue to play a role in restricting access to higher education.
In the latest ACER Joining the Dots research briefing, Principal Research Fellows Drs Sheldon Rothman and Daniel Edwards use data from Victoria’s annual post-school transitions survey to explore the extent to which deferral rates have changed since 2008, and the influence policy changes to financial support may have had on deferral decisions.
Their analysis reveals Year 12 completers from Victoria’s non-metropolitan schools are twice as likely to defer compared to students from metropolitan schools.
(via Media Centre | ACER)

New analysis by the Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER) reveals that, while there has been a substantial decline in the proportion of university deferrals in Victoria since student financial support has been increased, location and socioeconomic status continue to play a role in restricting access to higher education.

In the latest ACER Joining the Dots research briefing, Principal Research Fellows Drs Sheldon Rothman and Daniel Edwards use data from Victoria’s annual post-school transitions survey to explore the extent to which deferral rates have changed since 2008, and the influence policy changes to financial support may have had on deferral decisions.

Their analysis reveals Year 12 completers from Victoria’s non-metropolitan schools are twice as likely to defer compared to students from metropolitan schools.

(via Media Centre | ACER)

An interim report from the European University Association, or EUA, on the pattern of public funding for universities has highlighted how the character of higher education funding is changing – largely but not entirely as a result of economic pressures facing governments.The key to getting adequate funds these days is efficiency, says the report. 
Public providers of funds for higher education are increasingly looking for performance-related returns and are turning to large-scale restructuring through mergers or the creation of excellence initiatives, says the analysis based on data from 24 European countries.
(via Efficiency key to HE funding in Europe today – Report - University World News)

An interim report from the European University Association, or EUA, on the pattern of public funding for universities has highlighted how the character of higher education funding is changing – largely but not entirely as a result of economic pressures facing governments.

The key to getting adequate funds these days is efficiency, says the report

Public providers of funds for higher education are increasingly looking for performance-related returns and are turning to large-scale restructuring through mergers or the creation of excellence initiatives, says the analysis based on data from 24 European countries.

(via Efficiency key to HE funding in Europe today – Report - University World News)